Calculate sugar reduction in dairy

Try the Sweetness Calculator to estimate the potential sugar reduction in dairy products by using the lactase Saphera®

Download the technical specifications for Novozymes Saphera® in a variety of applications here. 

 

How to use the Sweetness Calculator

First, choose yogurt or flavored milk.

Then, fill in the field for lactose content in the raw yogurt formula, and the field for sucrose content in raw yogurt formula. The amount of lactose remaining after fermentation will automatically populate.

Now, press calculate. The tool will show you the theoretical amount of reduced sugar that you can use together with the lactase Saphera® to achieve the same relative sweetness as your original process.

  • Yogurt

  • Flavored milk

  • Amount of added sugar in your revised formula with Saphera®

    -

    Total sugar in your revised formula with Saphera®

    -

    Your result

    %

    Sugar compared to original

    %

    Total sugar reduction

    %

    Added sugar reduction

    Relative sweetness

    Sugar comes in many forms — a refined ingredient like table sugar, a natural component of milk like lactose, or the natural building blocks of these sugars such as glucose, fructose and galactose. Each type of sugar brings different relative sweetness, and that's one reason why different foods taste more or less sweet to us.  

    For food and beverage producers, taking sweetness into account is especially important when reformulating products. Lactose, for instance, is not particularly sweet on its own. But, when broken down with the lactase Saphera into glucose and galactose, the resulting sugars become almost 50% sweeter.

     

    Relative sweetness of different sugars in relation to sucrose

    • Lactose 39
    • Sucrose 100
    • D-Galactose 63
    • Glucose 69
  • Amount of added sugar in your revised formula with Saphera®

    -

    Total sugar in your revised formula with Saphera®

    -

    Your result

    %

    Sugar compared to original

    %

    Total sugar reduction

    %

    Added sugar reduction

    Relative sweetness

    Sugar comes in many forms — a refined ingredient like table sugar, a natural component of milk like lactose, or the natural building blocks of these sugars such as glucose, fructose and galactose. Each type of sugar brings different relative sweetness, and that's one reason why different foods taste more or less sweet to us.  

    For food and beverage producers, taking sweetness into account is especially important when reformulating products. Lactose, for instance, is not particularly sweet on its own. But, when broken down with the lactase Saphera into glucose and galactose, the resulting sugars become almost 50% sweeter.

    Relative sweetness of different sugars in relation to sucrose

    • Lactose 39
    • Sucrose 100
    • D-Galactose 63
    • Glucose 69
Reference: Lehrbuch der Lebensmittelchemie, 5. Auflage, Belitz-Grosch-Schieberle, Springer Verlag, 2001